From a 'cursed' sarcophagus to a trumpet that 'started WW2' – Tutankhamun's most mysterious relics

A SELECTION of Tutankhamun's burial treasures have just gone on display in London and they range from spooky to spectacular.

The following are some of the most unusual objects that were found alongside the young Pharaoh.

'Cursed' trumpet


The silver military trumpet was found inside Tutankhamun's tomb alongside a painted wooden core by archaeologist Howard Carter.

Carter actually found two of the gilded trumpets, one silver and one bronze, which are decorated with lotus flowers and Egyptian gods.

Both trumpets are thought to be cursed because Cairo suffered a blackout when one of them was first played after thousands of years.

World War II broke out shortly after it was played a second time.

Wishing Cup

This object is actually referred to as the Lotus chalice but Howard Carter called it the Wishing Cup.

It was one of the first objects found when the tomb was opened up.

It is made from a single piece of alabaster and is in the shape of a lotus flower in full bloom.

The chalice is thought to symbolise the eternal life of King Tutankhamun and his wish to be brought back to life.

It's inscription reads: "May your ka (soul) live, may you spend millions of years, you, who love Thebes, sitting with your face to the north wind, your eyes beholding happiness."

King Tut's gloves

An artefact that really brings Tutankhamun to life is this pair of gloves, which he may have worn during cool winter weather in Egypt.

Three thousand years ago they would have been bright red and blue and may have been used for driving a chariot through the desert.

Burial mask

This burial mask is perhaps one of the most famous artefacts to come from King Tutankhamun's tomb.

Unfortunately, it's not at the current London exhibition because it's too delicate to travel.

The mask was discovered in 1925 when Howard Carter and his team cracked open the sarcophagus containing Tut and found it on his body.

It's covered in gold and spells from the book of the dead.

Some people believe that the burial mask and King Tut's coffin are cursed because almost everyone involved in disturbing them died of painful diseases.

'Cursed' sarcophagus

The Egyptian boy king's gold-plated coffin – believed by some to be cursed – also isn't in London because it is busy being restored ready to go on display in Egypt.

Restoration work on the coffin, which is made of wood and covered with gold, will take about eight months.

The Tutankhamun: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh exhibition is on at the Saatchi Gallery in London from November 2, 2019 until May 3, 2020.


Who was King Tutankhamun?

Here’s everything you need to know

  • King Tutankhamun is the most famous of Egypt's ancient pharaohs
  • He ruled Egypt more than 3,000 years ago from 1332 to 1323 BC
  • Tut is known as the "boy king" as he was just 10 years old when he took the thrown
  • When he became the king he married his half-sister Ankhesenpaaten. They had two daughters together but both were stillborn
  • Tut died aged just 19 under mysterious circumstances
  • Some believe that he was assassinated but most think his death was an accident, likely the result of an infected leg following a nasty break
  • The pharaoh is also famous for the supposed curse that haunts his tomb
  • After the tomb's discovery in 1922, archaeologists, and even their family members, died from horrible illnesses or in strange accidents – and some say the deaths weren't a coincidence

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Which of the Tutankhamun artefacts do you find the most exciting? Let us know in the comments…

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