MD bar owner says worker shortage a ‘nightmare’ as customers line up

Returning travelers face understaffed businesses

Brian Bolter, owner of Dry 85 in Annapolis, Maryland, spoke with FOX Business about the impact of labor shortages in the service industry. 

The worker shortage in the service and tourism industry has been "a nightmare" as "angry customers" wait to get seated, according to one business owner.

Brian Bolter, owner of Dry 85 in Annapolis, Maryland, told FOX Business’ Edward Lawrence his struggles with the current labor shortage are due to the enhanced unemployment benefits. 

"It’s a nightmare. The government is paying $35,000 a year for basically a whole category of people to take the summer off," the bar owner said. "We have jobs that pay that and more. But we are dealing with a tremendous worker shortage that keeps us from being able to do the things that we do best, which is seat tables, have fast customer service."

WHY IT'S SO HARD TO FILL JOBS IN CERTAIN STATES

As travel rates start to return to pre-COVID levels, Americans looking to go out to eat and drink are being met with understaffed businesses.

Some areas in the U.S., like New England, are seeing especially tight labor markets, with about three open positions for every one unemployed job seeker in April, according to an analysis by job search site ZipRecruiter.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ON FOX BUSINESS

Businesses struggling to accommodate rise in travel

FOX Business’ Ed Lawrence talks with Dry 85 owner Brian Bolter about the latest obstacle restaurant owners are facing.

Bolter expressed frustration over the hiring process. 

"We've had classified ads out for months now and when we do get applicants, they set up an interview and then don't show up because they're checking that box to say, ‘Hey, I'm looking for a job’ when they're not really looking for a job," he said.

He went on to say understaffed businesses lead to a bad experience for patrons.  

"It’s lost revenue. It’s angry customers who see empty tables when they're standing there and they're told it's a two-hour wait," Bolter said. "It doesn't allow the customers to have a great experience." 

CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE FULL INTERVIEW

The Wall Street Journal contributed to this article. 

Source: Read Full Article