Hurricane Ian power outages in Florida surge past 150K ahead of landfall

video

FOX Business Flash top headlines for September 28

Check out what’s clicking on FoxBusiness.com

Floridians are beginning to lose power, with outages topping 150,000 before Category 4 Hurricane Ian makes landfall Wednesday.

Just hours earlier – around 5 a.m. – reported outages totaled approximately 35,000, according to PowerOutage.us.

The majority of the outages so far are in Collier County.

HURRICANE IAN STRENGTHENS TO 'EXTREMELY DANGEROUS' CATEGORY 4 STORM, TO MAKE FLORIDA LANDFALL WEDNESDAY 

People look out as clouds from the approaching Hurricane Ian darken the sky on Sept. 27, 2022, in St Petersburg, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images / Getty Images)

Ian is just shy of a Category 5 storm – and Gov. Ron DeSantis told residents Wednesday that the time has passed to evacuate.

"If you are in any of those counties, it's no longer possible to safely evacuate. It's time to hunker down and prepare for this storm," he urged.

LIVE UPDATES: HURRICANE IAN NEARS CATEGORY 5 STRENGTH

"This is going to be a nasty, nasty day, two days… So, this is going to be a rough stretch," DeSantis said.

Edward Montgomery and Courtney Viezux board up Montgomery’s apartment building as they prepare for the possible arrival of Hurricane Ian on Sept. 27, 2022, in St Petersburg, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images / Getty Images)

The National Hurricane Center said Wednesday that Ian would cause catastrophic storm surge, winds and flooding in Florida.

HURRICANE IAN DISRUPTS MAJOR CRUISE LINE ITINERARIES

The storm was located about 55 miles west-southwest of Naples, Florida, with maximum sustained winds at 155 miles per hour, as of 9 a.m. EDT Wednesday.

A bicyclist rides past a sign reading “No Ice Cream for Ian” painted on a building boarded up for the possible arrival of Hurricane Ian on Sept. 27, 2022, in St Petersburg, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images / Getty Images)

A storm surge warning was in effect for Suwannee River southward to Flamingo, Tampa Bay, the lower Florida Keys, Dry Tortugas, St. Johns River and the Flagler/Volusia Line to the mouth of the St. Mary's River.

GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE

The combination of storm surge and tide will cause normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by waters moving inland.

FOX Business' Julia Musto contributed to this report.

Source: Read Full Article